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Criminal Justice News

February 15, 2022

We are looking forward to another year together building our community of funders who are dedicated to abolition, healing, and liberation. As a part of our growing commitment to the movement, we’re thrilled to introduce our new Movement Advisors: Amber-Rose Howard, Ashley Rojas, Gilbert Johnson, and Morning Star Gali. See their bios below! 

December 7, 2021

A reflection on 2021 and looking ahead to 2022. 

October 28, 2021

CCJFG is creating a three-part podcast, Funding the Yes and we are proud to share the first episode with you!

September 9, 2021

The Sogorea Te’ Land Trust—an Indigenous women-led trust that facilitates the return of Indigenous land in the Bay Area—recently initiated a call to action to philanthropic institutions to pay institutional Shuumi Land Tax. CCJFG answered this call.

June 25, 2021

Interview with Janetta Johnson, Executive Director

May 17, 2021

Interview with Eddy Zheng, President and Founder 

April 5, 2021

CCJFG Steering Committee members are excited to share the following books and podcasts that have accompanied us as we settle into Spring 2021. The content ranges from writings on indigenous forms of justice and healing to a podcast tracing the connections between hip-hop and mass incarceration to a mixed media collection of responses to the question, what does it mean to be Black and alive? These stories are rigorous, compelling, and bring us closer to understanding the intersections of history, justice work, and future-making.

March 2, 2021

An interview with Somdeng Danny Thongsy, JRC Campaigner and Coordinator. 

February 5, 2021

Interview with maisha quint, Senior Program Officer

December 16, 2020

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on people in prison cannot be understated. As rates of infection rose inside prisons throughout the state, we witnessed our movement partners quickly and efficiently organize in response to this crisis. We witnessed the same tenacity and steadfastness this summer, as organizers led uprisings worldwide to protest racist state violence after the killing of George Flyod,  Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, and countless others—violence that is all too familiar for incarcerated people and their families.

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